DON'T LET ME DOWN!

Sitemap
The coats of arms of the Popes Pages on a specific Pope An 1852 map of Rome by P. Letarouilly Filippo Juvarra's drawings of the finest coats of arms XVIIIth century Rome in the 10 Books of Giuseppe Vasi - Le Magnificenze di Roma Antica e Moderna Visit Rome in 8 days! A 1781 map of Rome by G. Vasi The Grand View of Rome by G. Vasi Pages on the Venetian Fortresses, the Walls of Constantinople and many other topics Visit the Roman countryside following the steps of Ferdinand Gregorovius My Guestbooks A detailed index of my websites
Palazzo Sacchetti sulla Strada Giulia (Book 4) (Map C2) (Day 7)
(View D4) (Rione Ponte) and (Rione Regola)

In this page:
The plate by Giuseppe Vasi
Today's view
Palazzo Sacchetti
S. Biagio della Pagnotta
S. Maria del Suffragio e S. Anna dei Bresciani
Oratorio del Gonfalone
S. Spirito dei Napoletani e S. Filippo Neri
Carceri Nuove
S. Eligio degli Orefici and S. Niccol˛ degli Incoronati
Arco di Via Giulia

The Plate (No. 71)

Palazzo Sacchetti sulla Strada Giulia

Julius II is the Pope to whom Strada Giulia owes its name. Medieval Rome layout was very much influenced by the few families (Orsini, Colonna, Frangipane) who had transformed Roman buildings into fortresses with their followers living in small houses clustered around, with very little communication between one area and the other. With the progressive growth of the Papal supremacy over these families and with the aim of bringing Rome to the level of the northern cities of Italy where rational city layouts had been developed, Alexander VI started opening straight streets (Via Alessandrina) in the medieval net. Julius II with Via Giulia gave to Renaissance Rome its first high street by linking Ponte S. Angelo with Ponte Sisto. The view is taken from the green dot in the small 1748 map here below. In the description below the plate Vasi made reference to: 1) S. Biagio della Pagnotta; 2) S. Maria del Suffragio; 3) Carcere Nuovo; 4) Spirito Santo dei Napoletani; 5) Palazzo Falconieri; 6) a - Arco del Palazzo Farnese and b - Collegio Apostolico. 5) and 6b) are shown in other pages. The small map shows also 7) Palazzo Sacchetti; 8) S. Anna dei Bresciani; 9) S. Eligio degli Orefici; 10) S. Filippo Neri; 11) Oratorio del Gonfalone. The dotted orange line in the small map delineates the border between Rione Ponte (left) and Rione Regola (right).

Small ViewSmall View

Today

The view today

The center of Roman life having shifted towards Via del Corso and traffic being routed away make today Via Giulia a very exclusive and posh living area. Vasi's plate enlarges and shortens Via Giulia to show all the churches and palaces, so the view seems very different, but by walking along Via Giulia one finds that almost all the buildings quoted by Vasi are there with very little alterations.

Palazzo Sacchetti

Palazzo Sacchetti

Palazzo Sacchetti is a severe but elegant palace: it is not clear whether it was built by Sangallo the younger for his own living (as the inscription suggests) or that it was built slightly later, on the house of Sangallo. It was acquired in 1576 by the banker Tiberio Ceuli from Pisa who was considered the richest banker in Rome. His son however was soon bankrupt and forced to sell the building which was eventually bought by the Sacchetti from Florence. The Ceuli built the little fountain at the corner of the palace, while the erased coat of arms at the center of the fašade was of Paulus III the Maecenas of Sangallo. In 1660 Carlo Rainaldi built a fine nymphaeum in the garden which is clearly visible in the Great View of Rome. The garden had direct access to the river, today it is almost strangled by the new street along the river (Lungotevere) built at a higher level to prevent floods.

Palazzo Sacchetti details

S. Biagio della Pagnotta

S. Biagio della Pagnotta

The little church of S. Biagio is called "della Pagnotta" (of the round loaf) because on the day of S. Biagio (Feb. 3) little round loaves are distributed to children. The church was almost thoroughly rebuilt in 1730 by Giovanni Antonio Perfetti. It is also called S. Biagio degli Armeni, because it serves the Armenian community of Rome, hence the use of the Armenian alphabet in the script on the fašade (click here for a list of national churches in Rome).

S. Maria del Suffragio e S. Anna dei Bresciani

Two churches

Suffragio (suffrage) is a reference to the prayers for the souls of the dead which were the aim of the confraternity which erected the church in 1669. Carlo Rainaldi suggested an elliptical shape, but the confraternity preferred a more traditional and sober design. Between S. Biagio and S. Maria del Suffragio there was a little street leading to S. Anna dei Bresciani. Brescia, a Venetian town  between Milan and the Garda Lake, was and still is very rich and pious. The block of houses between S. Maria del Suffragio and the river belonged to the association of the inhabitants of Brescia in Rome. S. Anna dei Bresciani, with an interesting fašade by Carlo Fontana was pulled down to build the new quays. The plate at the bottom (M. G. Rossi) shows S. Anna and on the right S. Biagio. Some details of the monastery adjoining the church are still visible in the new buildings erected on the lungotevere.

Oratorio del Gonfalone

Oratorio del Gonfalone

A little church has existed on this site since the VIIIth century, but the current oratory was built in the XVIth century. The upper part of the fašade was added in the XVIIth century by Domenico Castelli. The confraternity owning the oratory was known for the organization of processions and other religious ceremonies. Their representations of Christ's Passion were so realistic that the Popes had to stop them as they ended in attacks against the Jews. The members wore a white habit and their heads were covered by a blue hood; the relief above the entrance shows a member of the confraternity to the right of the Virgin Mary. Gonfalone means standard/banner and it refers to the fact that in the XIVth century the members of the brotherhood used to raise the standard of the Pope (at the time in Avignon) to support his role as sovereign of Rome.
The interior of the oratory is fully painted with 12 gigantic frescoes showing the Way of the Cross.

S. Spirito dei Napoletani e S. Filippo Neri

Two churches

At the beginning of Via Giulia there is the church of the Florentines (S. Giovanni) and a few steps farther the church of the Neapolitans (click here for a list of national churches in Rome). It was restored in the XIXth century and it bears the coats of arms of Pius IX and of the King of Naples (or of the Two Sicilies) of the Bourbon family. Here was buried (until 1984) the only daughter of Francesco II the last King of Naples (she died when she was a child). Both the Pope and the King of Naples were accustomed to losing their kingdom and then regaining it. In 1848 Pius IX sought refuge in the Neapolitan fortress of Gaeta and stayed there under the protection of the King of Naples until the French regained control over Rome fighting against Garibaldi. In 1861 Francesco II left Gaeta (the fortress fell on February 14, and on March 20 Civitella del Tronto, the last stronghold loyal to him, surrendered) and came in exile to Rome with the hope to return one day to Naples. But in 1870 Pius IX lost his kingdom too. The Italy of the Seven States (Savoia, Lombardo-Veneto, Parma, Modena, Tuscany, Papal State and Kingdom of the Two Sicilies) was over.
S. Filippo Neri is one of the great Saints of the XVIth century, however in Rome only this little church (today only a fašade) was dedicated to him.

Carceri Nuove

Carceri Nuove

The prison of Rome was in Tor di Nona (opposite Castel S. Angelo) and had a scaring reputation. Innocentius X built a new prison (Carceri Nuove) which is today very nice to look at. However for those who had to enter the building for being jailed it was not that nice. A side street leading to Via Giulia at the point where the prison is, was rightly called Vicolo  del Malpasso (passo=step mal=bad, unfortunate).

S. Eligio degli Orefici

S. Eligio degli Orefici

The little church of the goldsmiths' guild was initially designed by Raphael and because of this it was spared by the quaying of the Tiber. The nearby church of S. Niccol˛ degli Incoronati was pulled down. S. Eligio is also honored by the blacksmits in S. Eligio dei Fabbri (click here for a list of churches belonging to a guild).

Arco di Via Giulia

Arco di Via Giulia

Via Giulia ends at the Collegio Ecclesiastico, but before that it passes between two very important palaces: Palazzo Farnese and Palazzo Falconieri, the main fašade of which is seen from the river. The side on Via Giulia has two interesting hawk heads (see background) Falconieri meaning hawkers. The Farnese had on the other side of the river their Villa (la Farnesina). Although nearby Ponte Sisto provided an easy passage to Trastevere, they built an arch over Via Giulia to the river bank, where by boat they could reach their Villa.

Excerpts from Giuseppe Vasi 1761 Itinerary related to this page:


Chiesa dello Spirito Santo de' Napoletani
Fu quivi anticamente una chiesa dedicata a s. Aurea vergine e martire con un monastero di monache, e dicevasi Castrum Senense ma essendo queste nel Pontificato di Onorio III. come molte altre trasportate nel monastero di s. Sisto, nel 1572. fu conceduta ad una confraternita di Napoletani, e rifacendo questi la chiesa la dedicarono allo Spirito Santo, e poi l'hanno ornata di marmi, e di pitture, tra le quali evvi il s. Gennaro dipinto da Luca Giordano, ed il s. Francesco di Paola da Ventura Lamberti; le pitture a fresco nella cupoletta sono di Giuseppe Passeri, ed il quadro sull'altare Ŕ di Giuseppe Ghezzi.
A sinistra di questa chiesa vi Ŕ il collegio Ghislieri fondato l'anno 1636. per la giovent¨, che ha voglia di studiare le scienze umane e divine senza obbligo del chiericato. E nel vicolo a destra della chiesa si vede la
Chiesa di s. Eligio degli Orefici
L'anno 1509. fu eretta questa chiesa dagli Orefici, ed Argentieri con disegno di Bramante Lazzari, ma poi nel 1601. fu riedificata sul medesimo disegno, e fu ornata di pitture e stucchi. I ss. Re Maggi nel primo altare, ed alcune pitture sull'altare maggiore sono del Romanelli, il quadro per˛ Ŕ di Matteo da Leccio, e la NativitÓ nell'altro Ŕ di Giovanni de' Vecchi.
Appresso di questa chiesa corrisponde il passaggio della barchetta, e nell'altro vicolo dopo il suddetto collegio si vede la
Chiesa di s. Niccol˛ degli Incoronati
Da una nobile famiglia Romana, che ancor ivi risiede porta il nome questa piccola chiesa, perchŔ dalla medesima fu eretta, e vi mantiene la cura delle anime. Ritornando poi sulla strada, si vede a destra altra piccola
Chiesa di s. Filippo Neri e Oratorio delle cinque piaghe
Nel Pontificato di Paolo V. fu edificata questa da Rotilio Brandi Fiorentino, il quale essendo devoto delle cinque piaghe del nostro Redentore, unitosi con altri pii fedeli vi eresse una confraternita, ed un oratorio, in cui se ne facesse particolare commemorazione. Il ss. Salvatore impiagato, che si vede in esso, Ŕ pittura di Federigo Zuccheri, ed il ss. Crocifisso di rilievo, che sta in chiesa, vi fu trasportato dalle grotte vaticane, e si crede fatto da' primi Cristiani. Incontro eccovi le
Carceri nuove
Da prima stavano le carceri incontro alla chiesa di Monferrato, che dicevansi a Corte Savelli; dipoi a Tordinona; ma finalmente Innoc. X. per dare pi¨ comodo a' poveri prigioni volle, che qui sulla strada Giulia fossero le nuove carceri, e poi furono terminate da Alessandro VII. con tutti i comodi spedienti; tanto per la salute del corpo, quanto per quella dell' anima, e ne fu incaricata l'Archiconfraternita della CaritÓ, la quale, come dicemmo, pensa ad alimentare i poveri, e a mantenere cappellani, ed ogni altro per la cultura delle anime.
Chiesa di s. Maria del suffragio
Nel 1594. risoluti alcuni fratelli della Confraternita della Morte, di impiegarsi con particolare istituto in suffragare le anime del Purgatorio; per qualche tempo esercitarono le loro funzioni nella vicina chiesa di s. Biagio della pagnotta; ma poi ottenuto questo luogo da Clemente VIII. nel Pontificato di Clemente X. eressero la loro chiesa, ed oratorio con disegno del Cav. Rainaldi, nella quale sono delle cappelle ornate di marmi, e di pitture, con varj depositi e sculture.
Nel vicolo a destra di questa chiesa, evvi l'oratorio dell'Archiconfraternita del Confalone, e in quello a sinistra la
Chiesa di s. Anna de' Bresciani
Il mentovato Buonarroti per comodo delli Notarj, e Curiali aveva piantata nella divisata curia una chiesa, la quale essendo ottenuta da una Confraternita di Bresciani nell' anno 1575. la compirono, e la dedicarono ai ss. Faustino e Giovita, ma poi avendo acquistata la reliquia di s. Anna, ne celebrarono con solennitÓ e pompa la festa; onde la chiesa ha preso il nome di questa. Fu dipoi rinnovata, e con disegno del Cav. Carlo Fontana ci fu fatto il prospetto. Sulli fondamenti della medesima Curia evvi ancora la
Chiesa di s. Biagio della Pagnotta
Molto antica Ŕ, come dicemmo, questa piccola chiesa, poichŔ fu eretta sopra il tempio di Nettunno, e fu una delle venti Badie privilegiate di Roma, consagrata da Alessandro II. circa l'anno 1069. e la possedevano li monaci Benedettini. Ma poi essendo stata unita al Capitolo di s. Pietro in Vaticano, rimase quý soltanto la cura delle anime, e della sua antichitÓ il campanile alla gotica. Si dice della pagnotta, per i panetti, che per devozione di quel Santo si dispensavano al popolo, che concorreva nella di lui festa: anticamente per˛ dicevasi Iner Tyberim, & Portam sancti Petri, & de cantu secuto. Siegue il
Palazzo Sacchetti
Da Antonio Sangallo Architetto di Paolo III. e con suo disegno fu edificato questo palazzo per sua abitazione: dipoi passato nella famiglia Leodi, e poi Sacchetti fu ornato di statue, busti antichi, e quadri di sommo pregio, e sono quelli, che vedemmo nella galleria di Campidoglio comprati da Benedetto XIV.

Next plate in Book 4: Palazzo Corsini

Next step in Day 7 itinerary: Chiesa di S. Lucia del Gonfalone
Next step in your tour of Rione Regola: S. Caterina alla Ruota
You have completed your tour of Rione Ponte!

Go to    or to  Book 4 or to my Home Page on Baroque Rome or to my Home Page on Rome in the footsteps of an XVIIIth century traveller.


All images © 1999 - 2003 by Roberto Piperno. Write to romapip@quipo.it